Controls

I direct learning for a CPA firm. I’m not a CPA, but I feel like I learn a lot from them.

One concept that auditors talk a lot about is controls. Controls are processes, tools, and checkpoints that businesses have in place to guard against error and fraud. For instance, if a large transaction requires the signature of the CFO, that’s a control. Password-protecting critical financial systems is a control.

In short, controls are a concept that auditors understand because auditors know that businesses with poor controls in place are going to be a lot harder to audit.

I’ve used controls as a way to explain the importance of measuring mastery of learning objectives. When an auditor–indeed, most any professional–is asked to design a course for less experienced professionals, their default is to typically treat it more like a presentation than a course and include little interactivity and no means for instructors to assess how well learners grasp the material before moving on to the next topic.

One could argue in good faith that it is the learner’s responsibility to learn. That as a professional if someone is struggling, it is on them to recognize that reality and take steps to ameliorate it. In reality, that puts the firm at risk.

So when I talk about introducing checkpoints and polling questions and case studies, I sometimes talk about them in terms of controls. Without those elements built into the course, we have no way of knowing if a course was effective (and more formatively, instructors will have no way of knowing whether what they are doing is working or whether they need to do something else).

Auditors know what separates a strong control from a weak one, so this becomes a powerful way to make the case for investing in classroom activities that provide evidence of learning.

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